Product Design
  • Next Up: Damian Royce

    Damian Royce is Creative Director at Whybin\TBWA Group in Melbourne.

    ANZ Bank GayTMs Case Study

    gaytms

    gaytm_receipt-screen

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    Interview Excerpt: Eugene Cheong, Chief Creative Officer, Ogilvy & Mather Asia Pacific, Singapore

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    I want to see five great things. Too often students try to bulk up their books, which only shows a lack of judgment and good taste. Ideally, I’d like to see a couple of posters. They are the ultimate test. Any fool can blow up an idea, but it takes a great deal of skill to boil a thought down to a few words and a single picture.

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    How important is finish? Could sketches be enough?

    Creative directors have [an] incredibly short attention span. Present your ideas in the most efficient manner and forget about all the crafty bits. As long as the idea comes across crystal clearly, roughs are fine. Of course, platform ideas need to be explained. The best way to do that is with a concept board, which, funnily enough, is not too dissimilar to a good old-fashioned press ad.

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    Read the full interview in BREAKING IN: Learn more about the book or Buy it on Amazon

    Next Up: Eugene Cheong

    Eugene Cheong is Chief Creative Officer, Ogilvy & Mather Asia Pacific.

    Coca-Cola – “Sharing Can”

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    Interview Excerpt: Craig Davis, Speaker, Professor, and Founder, BrandKarma

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    What do you look for in a student or junior portfolio? And what impresses you?

    I look for surprises. I look for the unexpected. I look for things I haven’t seen before. And I try to look behind the work as well and see what’s informed it. Because while the book is really, really important, I’d never hire someone on the strength of a book alone. I’m really interested in the person. I’m interested in why they’re doing what they’re doing. What drives them and what informs their work.

    Is that something that you find comes through in the work?

    Yes. It has to come through in the work. Advertising is a form of creative expression that’s created by someone, and there’s a signature to that which is individual. Or it should be. It’s fed by their curiosity.

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    Read the full interview in BREAKING IN: Learn more about the book or Buy it on Amazon

    Next Up: Craig Davis

    Craig is Adjunct Professor at University of Technology in Sydney, and sits on the Boards of Advance, the Creative Industries Taskforce and Conscious Capitalism Australia. Craig has also served as Co-Chairman and Chief Creative Officer for Publicis Mojo in Australia, Chairman of the Australasian Writers and Art Directors Club and Deputy Chair of The Communications Council.

    In his spare time he founded Brandkarma.com, the world’s first brand-centric social media platform. He blogs and tweets, and has written the most popular column for Campaign Asia-Pacific for the past three years.

    Burn – “Ride”

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    Interview Excerpt: Mitchell Ratchik, Freelance Creative Director, New York

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    What do you look for in a student or junior book?

    A student book should be a work of love. This is before you’ve actually “produced” anything or had clients or CDs alter your work. That being said, competition is fierce! I personally look for good thinking above all. I put on a second lens for art directors; they need to demonstrate good type and layout abilities. I’m more forgiving with writers. The best ones solve a problem using a unique perspective, and then they execute it well. A student book should be an extension of your personality and aesthetics.

    Common problems and things to avoid?

    The first big mistake students make is putting work in that they’ve actually “produced” but doesn’t really reflect their best thinking. My advice is “Don’t do it.” I’d rather see smart thinking and the ability to come up with a visual vernacular than some lame ad that actually ran. Also: be focused! The second big mistake is books that have a little of everything, but no focus. If you’re going into advertising, you need ads. It’s okay to show some other stuff as well, but the focus needs to be advertising.

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    Read the full interview in BREAKING IN: Learn more about the book or Buy it on Amazon

    Next Up: Mitchell Ratchik

    Mitchell Ratchik is a Freelance Art Director and Creative Director in New York.

    IBM

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    Interview Excerpt: CC Tang, Chief Creative Officer for Greater China, Havas Worldwide, Hong Kong

    Check out some great work from CC Tang.

    What do you think of showing work that is not advertising?

    When I was teaching, we had a program where students would work on real briefs. And we were working for the Hong Kong Airport Authority, trying to promote Terminal 2. And we had students from interior design, product design—not just ad students. So our solution was not what the brief was asking for. It was an installation and event. It was a giant chess board with airplanes in different colors. Like a playground. The whole thing was so unexpected that they decided to build it.

    At Ogilvy, where I was trained, they had a saying which came from David Ogilvy himself: “When you hire people, hire people from other trades.” The reason why he said that was that these people may see life differently. I think it’s true. I feel that new ideas are when two old ideas meet for the first time. So if people come from other backgrounds, why not? I don’t expect people I hired to contribute to the agency for the first year or 18 months. Because you have to invest a lot of time to train them. But this doesn’t happen much anymore. Someone is hired and is put to work on a computer doing Photoshop or layouts or retouching, and after a year or two they become very good at that but they may not become a good communicator. Maybe what the industry is lacking now is investing in talent. And I don’t believe the schools can do that. What you learn in school will be obsolete the day you walk out of school. Things are moving so fast.

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    Read the full interview in BREAKING IN: Learn more about the book or Buy it on Amazon

    Next Up: CC Tang

    CC Tang is Chief Creative Officer for Greater China at Havas Worldwide in Hong Kong.

    Nakamichi

    VO (Back translation):

    Not every bird is a song bird.

    Similarly, not every sound equipment is hi-fi (high fidelity).

    Only those who can deliver the true essence of music.

    To capture the real essence of music, it has to be Nakamichi.

    Nakamichi car stereo system, the real song bird.

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    Interview Excerpt: Ant Keogh, Executive Creative Director, Clemenger BBDO, Melbourne

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    What do you look for in a student portfolio? And what impresses you?

    I suppose it’s looking at things in a different way. Solving a problem with a different angle than most people would come up with and yet one that’s still somewhat practical. An imaginative approach is what you’re initially looking for, although if you get completely crazy ideas without any sense of practicality then that’s too easy. Because advertising is that mix of lateral and logical thinking. Worse though is if it’s too buttoned down, because it’s easier to teach that than to teach raw creative instinct. You want to turn each page and say, “Great idea, great idea, great idea.” And it doesn’t matter if they are pencil drawings or the most simple version of an idea, if that idea shines through. But you just want to see a succession of them so you get a sense for their “strike rate” in problem solving.

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    Read the full interview in BREAKING IN: Learn more about the book or Buy it on Amazon